geo-engineering experts since 2002, Asilomar International Conference on Climate Intervention ,  Solar radiation management, geoengineers, Marine Cloud Brightening,  ocean acidification,  stratospheric sulfate aerosols,  Carbon dioxide removal, Greenhouse gas remediation and Carbon sequestration, climate change,  runaway global warming,  Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum, UNFCCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Arctic geoengineering, Carbon negative fuel, Convention on Biological Diversity, Earth systems engineering and management,

 

 

 

INdRA 

Interior Natural Desert Reclamation and Afforestation projects

 

Geo-engineering Region by Region

      Redefining Acts Of God

 

geo-engineering experts since 2002, Asilomar International Conference on Climate Intervention ,  Solar radiation management, geoengineers, Marine Cloud Brightening,  ocean acidification,  stratospheric sulfate aerosols,  Carbon dioxide removal, Greenhouse gas remediation and Carbon sequestration, climate change,  runaway global warming,  Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum, UNFCCC, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Arctic geoengineering, Carbon negative fuel, Convention on Biological Diversity, Earth systems engineering and management,

   

 

 

INdRA  California Wildfires Project

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geo-engineering experts since 2002,Asilomar International Conference on Climate Intervention , Solar radiation management,geoengineers,Marine Cloud Brightening, ocean acidification, stratospheric sulfate aerosols, Carbon dioxide removal,Greenhouse gas remediation & Carbon sequestration,climate change, runaway global warming, desertification,desertification mediation,rain maker,ground based cloud enhancement,atmospheric heat control,wind management,rain farming,transborder humidity management,precipitation sheds,watershed modification,Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum,UNFCCC,Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC),Arctic geoengineering,Carbon negative fuel,Convention on Biological Diversity,Earth systems engineering & management,biorecharge,wildfire control,drought mitigation,Five Ways to Save the World,Haida Gwaii geoengineering controversy,climate control,climate management,climate evolution,atmospheric evolution,atmospheric management,air pollution control,air polution mitigation,hail cannons,weather control,weather modification,gare hypothesis,regional geoengineering,local geoengineering,regional weater modifiction,List of geoengineering topics,Macro-engineering,Planetary engineering,Project,Stormfury,Terraforming,Virgin Earth Challenge,Weather control,Hurricane modification,Convention on Biological Diversity

 

The wildfires in southern California INdRA California Wildfires Project have become endemic.  Each year thousands of brave firefighters risk life and limb to combat these blazes which ravage thousands of acres, destroying hundreds of homes, and costing both California residents and insurance consumers nationwide billions of dollars annually.

Does this situation have to exist, and will it get worse as one of the long term consequences of a warming planet?

We propose a series of INdRA evaporation projects, each costing a fraction of the annual costs already incurring each year, that will effectively mitigate this horror.

 

  geo-engineering experts since 2002,Asilomar International Conference on Climate Intervention , Solar radiation management,geoengineers,Marine Cloud Brightening, ocean acidification, stratospheric sulfate aerosols, Carbon dioxide removal,Greenhouse gas remediation & Carbon sequestration,climate change, runaway global warming, desertification,desertification mediation,rain maker,ground based cloud enhancement,atmospheric heat control,wind management,rain farming,transborder humidity management,precipitation sheds,watershed modification,Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum,UNFCCC,Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC),Arctic geoengineering,Carbon negative fuel,Convention on Biological Diversity,Earth systems engineering & management,biorecharge,wildfire control,drought mitigation,Five Ways to Save the World,Haida Gwaii geoengineering controversy,climate control,climate management,climate evolution,atmospheric evolution,atmospheric management,air pollution control,air polution mitigation,hail cannons,weather control,weather modification,gare hypothesis,regional geoengineering,local geoengineering,regional weater modifiction,List of geoengineering topics,Macro-engineering,Planetary engineering,Project,Stormfury,Terraforming,Virgin Earth Challenge,Weather control,Hurricane modification,Convention on Biological Diversity

 

We propose three evaporation projects to combat the historic wildfire sites.  At each of these sites 1 or more dual channel systems, (including one closed pipe channel, and a wide evaporation optimized channels) will be constructed from the ocean, terminating in a salt marsh.

The evaporation channels will be lined with a dark uneven water-swell-able clay (possibly combined with some synthetic zeolites to aid generating a salt isolation layer), and where evaporation is desirable the seawater will travel at shallow depths (3-6 inches) to facilitate maximum solar powered evaporation. 

The channels will also feature evaporation appliances, such as misting jets, wind powered aerators, and drops where feasible.  Elevations will be via clay pipes, and powered by clean energy sources such as wind, solar or gravity.

The objective of each of these projects will be to allow local authorities to ensure sufficient average rainfall in the region. Average rainfall will be effectively manipulated by dynamically facilitating increased evaporation, of hundreds of thousands of gallons of seawater daily through specific regions, or restricting the same.

The technology is very simple, and therefore both relatively inexpensive to build, and easy to maintain.  The channel construction, not considering elevations,  will primarily consist of right-of-way solutions, grading,  lining, and seeding of a riparian zone on each side.  Maintenance will consist of equipment maintenance, (pumps, gates, generators, etc.), and periodic channel surfacing, grading, and salt remediation.

The goal of each project will be to provide regional authorities with the ability to maintain optimal average rainfall rates on a seasonal basis.  The benefits of the program will include;

  1. Reduction of wildfires:
  2. General drought reduction:
  3. Management of rain based irrigation:
  4. Replenishment of groundwater sources:
  5. Increased biodiversity of interior regions:

∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞

The California wildfires have become a constant reality, no longer a seasonal phenomena.    We are promoting an INdRA evaporation project, that will increase the average rainfall in this region by approximately 23%.   This increase will be sufficient to minimize the risk of both natural and human caused wildfires within 2 years of implementation.

Background: Wikipedia:

The October 2007 California wildfires were a series of wildfires that began burning across Southern California on October 20. At least 1,500 homes were destroyed[7] and over 500,000 acres (2,000 km˛, or about 770 mi˛) of land burned from Santa Barbara County to the U.S.–Mexico border. Nine people died as a direct result of the fire;[8] 85 others were injured, including at least 61 firefighters.[9]

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency in seven California counties where fires were burning.[10] President George W. Bush concurred, and ordered federal aid to supplement state and local response efforts.[11] Over 6,000 firefighters worked to fight the blazes; they were aided by units of the United States Armed Forces,[12] United States National Guard,[13] almost 3,000 prisoners convicted of non-violent crimes,[14] and 60 firefighters from the Mexican cities of Tijuana and Tecate.[15]

Major contributing factors to the extreme fire conditions were drought in Southern California, hot weather, and unusually strong Santa Ana winds with gusts reaching 85 mph (140 km/h).[16]

The fires had numerous sources. Several were triggered by power lines damaged by the high winds.[17] [18] One fire started when a semi-truck overturned.[19] Another was suspected as having been deliberately caused; the suspect was shot and killed at the flight by state authorities.[20] A 10-year-old boy admitted that he accidentally started the Buckweed Fire playing with matches.[21] Causes of the remaining fires remain under investigation. The last fire was fully contained on November 9, 2007, 19 days after the series of fires started.[22]

 

The program costs are estimated at;

Initial costs: reports proposed by 8/25/10

  1. Right of way solutions:
  2. Channel construction: Materials and Labor 
  3. Pump and general equipment purchases :
  4. Salt marsh construction: $30K-300K per acre (Louis Berger and Associates 1997)
  5. Litigation:

Maintenance costs:

  1. System management and administration :
  2. Channel maintenance:
  3. Equipment maintenance:
  4. Litigation:

Funding sources:

Federal:

  1. National Marine Fisheries Service
  2. Environmental Protection Agency
  3. Corps of Engineers
  4. US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Commercial sources:

  1. Carbon trading
  2. Real estate developers
  3. Agricultural cooperatives

These projects will build a base of the longer term Great Basin and Mohave de-desertification projects.

 

  Southern Project: 8/25/16

 

 

  Mid-state Project:  8/25/17

 

  Northern Project:  8/25/18

 

  Note:  These reports are in progress, but severely limited by a lack of R&D funding.